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Archive for the 'Kimono' Category

7/23/2008

Kimono Fashion Show

I would like to own one someday. I just need to get USD10k out of my wallet, hold on.

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono, Traditional Outfits | 1 Comment »

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4/29/2008

JWSF Kimono Samba fashion

I’ve blogged so much about Japanese street fashion, I feel like I have neglected the traditional aspect of Japanese fashion. Who says tradition has to be boring? The Japanese Women’s Society Foundation would like to digress and present you with their ultra hip fashion show utilizing kimono and it’s materials by a couture fashion designer, Chieko Yamaguchi.


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1/25/2007

Types of Kimono: Hadajuban

Hadajuban is the undergarment worn beneath a kimono attire. So, technically, it is a lingerie. It is name Hadajuban because it is meant to wear next to the skin. Since kimono is always about layering, it is no wonder that you have layers of clothe beneath the beautiful kimono.

Hadajuban is usually worn only with traditional full fledge kimono. And on top the hadajuban a nagajuban is added to give it a more collar definition. So, in this case, you will never see hadajuban worn with a Yukata, the casual kimono.

Here are some pictures of Hadajuban (no semi-naked chick pix! sorry :P)

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hadajuban 1

hadajuban-2.jpg

Hadajuban 2

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nagajuban up close

Source: Japan Lifestyle

Related Links:
Types of Kimono: Tomesode
Types of Kimono: Houmongi
Types of Kimono: Yukata
Types of Kimono: Furisode
Kimonos
The Japanese Kimono

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono, Lingerie | No Comments »

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1/17/2007

Types of Kimonos: Tomesode

Tomesode is a formal Japanese kimono that married women wear to weddings of their relatives.. Now it’s different from a Houmongi because although Houmongi is a formal kimono for married women, it’s for the general as Tomesode is for a much specific kind married women in a wedding of their relative.

The Tomesode will not be worn at a friend’s wedding. That would be weird.

The black fabric of the Tomesode is made in the purpose to contrast the wedding kimono which is white in color. And the colorful obi worn with the Tomesode signifies a happy occassion.

Here are some pictures of Tomesode with different Obis:-

tomesode1.jpg

Tomesode from a blog

tomesode2.jpg

Tomesode from a fashion catalogue

tomesode3.jpg

Tomesode from a Kimono gallery

Source: Japan LifeStyle

Related Links:
Types of Kimono: Houmongi
Types of Kimono: Yukata
Types of Kimono: Furisode
Kimonos
The Japanese Kimono

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono | No Comments »

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1/17/2007

Types of Kimonos – Houmongi

When a Japanese woman marries, her parents will give her another set of kimono to signify her womanhood has transcended into a married life. The Houmongi takes over the role of the Furisode in this instance. Therefore, the houmongi is the married woman’s kimono. You will see the difference in the humbleness of the design – it less bold in colors and yet regal and elegant.

Usually, this kimono is worn to tea ceremonies and weddings.

Here are some pictures of the Houmongi Kimono.

houmongi-1.gif

Houmongi 1

houmongi2.jpg

Houmongi 2

houmongi3.jpg

Houmongi 3

Source: Japanese LifeStyle

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono | No Comments »

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1/11/2007

Types of Kimonos: Furisode

When a young woman turns 20, her parents would buy her a new set of kimono that marks her coming of age. The kimono is called Furisode. You can read about the different types of women’s kimonos here.

Many parents buy the Furisode for their daughters to celebrate this significant point in a young woman’s life. Furisode is a formal kimono for single women, it is brightly colored and made of very fine quality silk. In the very modest Japanese society wearing a Furisode is a very obvious statement. It is a very loud and clear advertisement that the single woman is available for marriage.

The main difference between a Furisode and the other types of kimono is its extremely long sleeves. Furisodes are mainly worn by single women in weddings and tea ceremonies. A Furisode usually costs around USD15,000.

Every second monday of the month of January of every year is called an “Adult Day” and it’s a public holiday. And on this day, you will see young women dressed up in their Furisode attending ceremonies.

Below you can see some pictures of young women in their Furisode kimono.

furisode1.jpg

Taken from furisode.com


furisode21.jpg

Taken from a Japanese girl’s blog


furisode3.jpg

Taken from a Japanese photo studio

I think the Furisode is the most prettiest kimono of them all, although as you grow older, you kimono becomes more and more elegant.

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono | 5 Comments »

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1/4/2007

Kimonos

teruyuki06.jpg

Kimonos are perhaps one of those things I know I would like to have and know I would never ever have the chance to wear without looking like a donk from a different era or area, for that matter. Kimonos are really lovely and reading Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden 6 times over, made me dream about becoming one just so I can wear a Kimono but I wouldn’t want to be Sayuri with her Dr. Crab experience….. if you think that sounds dodgy, you’re right. But moving on to Kimonos, they really a treasured heritage that is upheld highly by the Japanese culture. Not many women wear elaborate kimonos anymore but some modern day maikos or geishas still do although not as elaborately as it was before. And kimonos are still worn during weddings. Just like how the white dress is a must for most weddings in the west.360px-wedding_kimono.jpg

Kimono (着物, literally “something worn”, i.e., “clothes”) are the traditional garments of Japan. Originally kimono was used for all types of clothing, but it came to refer specifically to the full-length garment that is still worn by women, men, and children. Kimono are T-shaped, straight-lined robes that fall to the ankle, with collars and full-length sleeves.

The original type of kimono was mainly influenced by the Chinese Hanfu through extensive cultural exchanges between the two countries starting in the 5th century ce. The modern kimono began to take shape during Japan’s Heian period (794–1192 ce). Since then, the basic shape of both men’s and women’s kimono has remained essentially unchanged.

All traditional kimono are sewn by hand, and the fabrics from which they are created are also frequently hand made and hand decorated. Various techniques such as yuzen dye resist (made with a kimono which governs where the pattern is distributed and if it is a singular or a repeating pattern. Repeating patterns that cover a large section of the kimono are traditionally done with the yuzen resist technique and a stencil.

Kimonos can be expensive. For a full piece of kimono equipped with it’s obi, undergarments, ties, socks and shoes, you are looking at about USD20,000. But these are the top of the line ones, although you can get a very cheap second hand kimono made from cheaper materials for as low as 500 yen. Anyhow, the kimono is a true masterpiece that is worth every cent – because a traditional hand sewn kimono is very precious. Who wants standard kimonos generated from a factory somewhere? Kinda beats the purpose of having a kimono in the first place.

If I have a kimono, I would like to have my family crest on it, maybe have it printed on like an LV bag. Haha. Right.

Here are some beautiful pictures of Kimonos.

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Traditional bamboo print white wedding kimono

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Red wedding kimono

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Obi

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Kimonos used in Kabuki play

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Casual Cotton print Kimono

pictures of kimono taken from here, here and here

Posted by The Expedited Writer in Japanese Fashion, Kimono | 1 Comment »

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1/3/2007

Fashion.3yen.com in 2007

G’day people!

Happy New Year! I hope you all had a great and safe holiday season. It’s about now that people are geting back to work or school, flicking on the PC and directing their browsers at 3yen to avoid doing whatever they’re meant to be doing, heh.

Well, we hope to make your procrastination worthwhile in 2007. Firstly, we have a new blogger in our ranks: The Expedited Writer! She’ll be writing here in Fashion.3yen.com as well as some other places on the 3yen site. I’ll still be here and around the site too, no fear.

We’ve also recently moved to a new server which never goes without a few hiccups, so apologies to people who have made comments that haven’t appeared on the site. They should be up there now and you shouldn’t need to wait to be moderated in the future. Just make sure you use the same name and email in all your comments.

Well then, that’s all of the admin stuff out ofthe way. Stay tuned for more Japanese fashion goodness on 3yen in 2007 :) To start you off: a photo.

Photo by Chidade http://chidade.net

This was taken in Kyoto where there are dozens of businesses that dress you up as a geisha or maiko for a fee. Men can dress up as samurai or feudal lords. Except one man. Yes, the one on the right in the photo. He decided that the hakama is kinda boring and wanted to try his hand at those 10cm high geta that the women get to struggle on!

Ha, crossdressing was probably invented by the Japanese.


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